WebDAV

WebDAV allows you to upload files directly to a web server over the HTTP channel, instead of requiring a separate FTP server. The BSOE uses WebDAV to allow users to upload content to our web server whenever a CMS, such as Drupal, is not being used. Many web editing tools, such as Dreamweaver and Contribute, come with build-in WebDAV clients.

Microsoft Windows

Internet Explorer 8 removed support for WebDAV folders from Windows. The best option for Windows users is BitKinex's WebDAV Client.

Macintosh

Macintosh has built-in support for WebDAV. To create a WebDAV connection in Mac OSX, follow these instructions:

  1. Open the Finder.
  2. In the menu at the top of the screen, click Go and then Connect to Server.
  3. In the Server Address box, type your WebDAV URL (for example, https://your-site.soe.ucsc.edu:90). If you would like, you can then click the plus button (+) to remember this server for the future. Then click Connect.
  4. Enter your WebDAV user name and password. You can also optionally check the "Remember my password in the keychain" box so that you won't be prompted for your password in the future.

A new Finder window should appear, which will be connected to the WebDAV server. You can now drag and drop files to and from this Finder window to transfer files to and from the server.

Linux / UNIX

For Gnome desktops, click the Places menu select Computer, and then Connect to Server. In the Server Address box, type your WebDAV URL (for example, https://your-site.soe.ucsc.edu:90).

For command-line users, most Unix-like operating systems come with Cadaver. You can connect to a WebDAV server by entering the following command:

cadaver https://your-site.soe.ucsc.edu:90

Of course, be sure to replace your-site with the actual URL for your web site.

Another option is to use DAVFS.